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19th & 20th century tiaras

shezzablue:

missmindicarriesbaby5:

jesseproch:

emt-monster:

Please reblog if you know anyone who might take party drugs.

I’m not an emt yet, but everytime I see someone do drugs, I just hope they’re smart enough to remember these points.

I really love this, because as someone with anxiety when I did take party drugs way back when I was always scared of going to the hospital because I didnt want to be arrested…..even when I bad tripped and cried in the bathroom for 10 hours because I thought Jeff was trying to murder me. I dont do party drugs anymore, but it still is comforting to me….seriously.

Most EMTS and medics I’ve met are some of the most non-judgmental folks ever. Look, we love helping people and saving lives. That’s what we went to school for. Help us help you, and everyone will fare better for it. 

Anonymous said: hello! i've been thinking about getting my septum piercied and i was wondering: does it get in the way when you kiss? also, does it hurt as much as it seems to hurt? thanks!

Haha what a funny question! I was actually concerned about that a lot when I first got my nose pierced because I was/still am in a relationship! I have not noticed it getting in the way very much at all! It kind of lays flat against your face when you kiss. I’ve even asked my boyfriend if he notices it ever and he never does. 

I’ll be honest about two things here: 1) I’m a baby when it comes to pain and needles but also 2) yes it did hurt a lot when I got it pierced. 

The healing was not so bad! Even though I’m a wuss, I still recommend it. I never regretted it and I would do it again if given the chance! 

Plus they’re super easy to hide which is a bonus.

hoodsandhats:

every single cousin!

archiemcphee:

Kawaii! These little kitties aren’t just unbelievably cute, they’re also edible. They’re made by a Japanese mom named Caroline for Neko no Hi or Cat Day, which takes place each year on February 22nd.

Cat-shaped treats seem like a wonderful way to celebrate how much you like your feline friends. These treats are cat-shaped nerikiri, which is “a traditional Japanese sweet made by mixing shiro-an (sweetened white bean paste) with gyuhi (made of glutinous rice, similar to mochi but softer).” Caroline sculpts her nerikiri cats and kittens into various sizes and poses and then uses edible dyes to add distinguishing markings and fine details. She even makes little accessories for them, like tea sets and pillows for extra-comfy lounging.

Based on the effort that goes into making these sweets, it seems likely that Caroline’s family probably has at least one real life cat of their own and we’re guessing it leads a wonderfully spoiled life.

Visit RocketNews24 for additional photos.

watserbones:

ehmeegee:

Iced gingerbread grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) cookies - the icing was quite thin and I didn’t have the right piping, but this is a design I’ve played with for a while and I hope to get the method down some day soon. There is a lot of potential with other cookie cutters, but I prefer to go for variations on the vertebrate skeleton. 
from The Best Recipe cook book: 
3 cups all-purpose flour
¾ cup dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
1 tablespoon ground ginger
½ teaspoon ground cloves
½ teaspoon salt
¾ teaspoon baking soda
¾ cup (6 ounces) unsalted butter, cut into 12 pieces and softened slightly
¾ cup molasses
2 tablespoons milk
for Icing: 
1 cup powdered sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla or almond extract (experiment!)
1-2 tbsp milk
1. In the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with paddle attachment, stir together flour, sugar, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, salt and baking soda at low speed until combined, about 30 seconds. Stop mixer and add butter pieces; mix at medium-low speed until mixture is sandy and resembles fine meal, about 1½ minutes. Reduce speed to low and, with mixer running, gradually add molasses and milk; mix until dough is evenly moistened, about 20 seconds. Increase speed to medium and mix until thoroughly combined, about 10 seconds.
2. Scrape dough onto work surface; divide in half. Working with one portion of dough at a time, roll ¼-inch thick between two large sheets of parchment paper. Leaving dough sandwiched between parchment layers, stack on cookie sheet and freeze until firm, 15 to 20 minutes. (Alternatively, refrigerate dough 2 hours or overnight.)
3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper.
4. Remove one dough sheet from freezer; place on work surface. Peel off top parchment sheet and lay it back in place. Flip dough over; peel off and discard second parchment layer. Cut dough into gingerbread people or round cookies, transferring shapes to parchment-line cookie sheets with a wide metal spatula, spacing them ¾-inch apart. Repeat with remaining dough until cookie sheets are full. I laid out saran/plastic wrap on my counter to roll out the dough as the parchment paper slipped around too much. This helps you avoid adding more flour to the dough and making it tough.
Bake cookies until set in centers and dough barely retains imprint when touched very gently with fingertip, 8 to 11 minutes, rotating cookie sheet from front to back halfway through baking time. Do not overbake. Cool cookies on sheets 2 minutes, then remove with wide metal spatula to wire rack; cool to room temperature.
5. Gather scraps; repeat rolling, cutting and baking in steps 2 and 4. Repeat with remaining dough until all dough is used.
6. Once cookies are cool, decorate with royal icing, if desired. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 1 week.

MEG WE ARE DOING THIS, YOU HEAR ME?!?!

watserbones:

ehmeegee:

Iced gingerbread grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) cookies - the icing was quite thin and I didn’t have the right piping, but this is a design I’ve played with for a while and I hope to get the method down some day soon. There is a lot of potential with other cookie cutters, but I prefer to go for variations on the vertebrate skeleton. 

from The Best Recipe cook book: 

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • ¾ cup dark brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¾ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¾ cup (6 ounces) unsalted butter, cut into 12 pieces and softened slightly
  • ¾ cup molasses
  • 2 tablespoons milk

for Icing: 

  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla or almond extract (experiment!)
  • 1-2 tbsp milk

1. In the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with paddle attachment, stir together flour, sugar, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, salt and baking soda at low speed until combined, about 30 seconds. Stop mixer and add butter pieces; mix at medium-low speed until mixture is sandy and resembles fine meal, about 1½ minutes. Reduce speed to low and, with mixer running, gradually add molasses and milk; mix until dough is evenly moistened, about 20 seconds. Increase speed to medium and mix until thoroughly combined, about 10 seconds.

2. Scrape dough onto work surface; divide in half. Working with one portion of dough at a time, roll ¼-inch thick between two large sheets of parchment paper. Leaving dough sandwiched between parchment layers, stack on cookie sheet and freeze until firm, 15 to 20 minutes. (Alternatively, refrigerate dough 2 hours or overnight.)

3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper.

4. Remove one dough sheet from freezer; place on work surface. Peel off top parchment sheet and lay it back in place. Flip dough over; peel off and discard second parchment layer. Cut dough into gingerbread people or round cookies, transferring shapes to parchment-line cookie sheets with a wide metal spatula, spacing them ¾-inch apart. Repeat with remaining dough until cookie sheets are full. I laid out saran/plastic wrap on my counter to roll out the dough as the parchment paper slipped around too much. This helps you avoid adding more flour to the dough and making it tough.

Bake cookies until set in centers and dough barely retains imprint when touched very gently with fingertip, 8 to 11 minutes, rotating cookie sheet from front to back halfway through baking time. Do not overbake. Cool cookies on sheets 2 minutes, then remove with wide metal spatula to wire rack; cool to room temperature.

5. Gather scraps; repeat rolling, cutting and baking in steps 2 and 4. Repeat with remaining dough until all dough is used.

6. Once cookies are cool, decorate with royal icing, if desired. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 1 week.

MEG WE ARE DOING THIS, YOU HEAR ME?!?!